About Me

London W1, West End Marylebone Westminster, United Kingdom
Andrew Veitch solicitor ( LL.B., M.A., PgDip )is a former partner and now consultant in Guy Clapham and Co solicitors. He deals with the following areas of law: commercial and residential property, conveyancing, litigation (including neighbour disputes), divorce, family, debt collection, landlord and tenant, wills, trust, probate, personal injury and employment. Andrew's clients range from large companies and property developers to local businesses and individuals throughout London and the whole of England and Wales. The office is in the West End of London just off Marylebone High Street and north of Oxford Street and is located within walking distance of the following tube stations: Marylebone , Marble Arch , Baker Street , Bond Street , Oxford Circus , Great Portland Street , Regents Park , Euston and Kings Cross. Please contact me at: Guy Clapham & Co solicitors 51 - 55 Weymouth Street Marylebone London W1G 8NH DX: 83300 WEST END 2 Tel: 020 7935 1095 Fax: 020 7935 9127 E-Mail: av@guyclapham.com Website: www.guyclapham.com

Monday, 13 October 2014


 WILL DRAFTING - CHANGES TO INTESTACY RULES

If you die without leaving a valid will your estate (everything you own) has to be shared out in accordance with  the Intestacy Rules.

Due to  The Inheritance and Trustees Powers Act 2014 (ITPA 2014) as from 1st October 2014  the way in which the assets of people who die without wills are shared between their relatives has changed.

From 1st October 2014 spouses and civil partners have new inheritance rights under the intestacy rules, as well as  adopted children, unmarried fathers and other family members and dependents. There are also changes to the powers trustees have to deal with the capital and income of trusts

Due to the new intestacy rules a spouse (husband or wife) or civil partner may inherit the whole of the deceased’s estate. Although, if the deceased also leaves children the estate has to be shared between the surviving spouse/civil partner and the children. 

Further changes are that under the old rules survivors were entitled to receive an amount called the statutory legacy. This was a   fixed sum of  £250,000 where there were surviving children or £450,000 if there were no children. Under the new rules the statutory legacy will be reviewed (at least every five years) and rise in line with the Consumer Prices Index.

There are also new inheritance rights for unmarried fathers as under the old rules where a child died whose parents were not married  the child’s estate was to be distributed as if the child’s father and had died before the child. Under the new rules this will not apply if the child’s father’s name appears on the child's birth certificate.

There are also new rules to make  it easier for dependants to claim financial support from a deceased partner or parent if they would not receive anything under the intestacy rules.

The new intestacy rules also allow trustees to use all of the capital and income of a trust for the benefit of beneficiaries, compared to only half the capital and income under the old rules.


Nevertheless, it is still sensible to have a will drafted so that you can ensure your estate is distributed in accordance with your wishes when you die and in order to provide the trustees of your estate with additional authority to deal with your estate as you wish. This is especially the case if you do not wish for your estate to be dealt with in accordance with the strict intestacy rules or wish to leave a particular item, such as an amount of money, watch, wedding ring, house or shares etc, to a particular person.

If you contact Andrew Veitch (andrew@guyclapham.com)  he may be willing to review your financial circumstances and the way you propose to distribute your estate free of charge in order to provide an estimate of fees for drafting your will.




This blog provides basic general legal information to help people understand their legal rights, but is not a substitute for personal legal advice from a solicitor. By the very nature of a blog the information published in blog posts on this site may be out of date. Therefore this blog is subject to our following disclaimer and conditions of use: Where no personal consultation has taken place with Andrew Veitch or the partners or employees of Guy Clapham & Co under no circumstances will Andrew Veitch or the partners of Guy Clapham & Co be responsible for (1) any information contained in, omitted or received from this site, (2) any persons reliance on any such information, whether or not the information is correct, current or complete, (3) the consequences of any action you or any other person takes or fails to take, whether or not based on information provided (4)

Tuesday, 12 February 2013

HIGHLY RECOMMENDED AND RATED LAWYER IN LONDON W1 - ANDREW VEITCH SOLICITOR


INDEPENDENT REVIEWS OF ANDREW VEITCH SOLICITOR


 
Value For Money :
Professionalism :
Quality :
 
5 stars
 
6
4 stars
 
1
3 stars
 
0
2 stars
 
0
1 stars
 
0


Andrew Veitch has received 7 reviews on the  Freeindex recommendation web-site. 

6 reviews rated Andrew Veitch as 5 star (exceptional) solicitor

1 review rated Andrew Veitch as a four star (good) solicitor.




This blog provides basic general legal information to help people understand their legal rights, but is not a substitute for personal legal advice from a solicitor. By the very nature of a blog the information published in blog posts on this site may be out of date. Therefore this blog is subject to our following disclaimer and conditions of use: Where no personal consultation has taken place with Andrew Veitch or the partners or employees of Guy Clapham & Co under no circumstances will Andrew Veitch or the partners of Guy Clapham & Co be responsible for (1) any information contained in, omitted or received from this site, (2) any persons reliance on any such information, whether or not the information is correct, current or complete, (3) the consequences of any action you or any other person takes or fails to take, whether or not based on information provided (4)

Wednesday, 30 January 2013

DO YOU STILL HAVE A REDUNDANCY CLAIM ? - EMPLOYMENT SOLICITOR ANDREW VEITCH LONDON W1

HAS THERE BEEN A CHANGE IN THE  SELECTION CRITERIA FOR REDUNDANCY?


Normally employers have been required to use "objective" selection criteria to ascertain which employees are selected for redundancy. This involved a selection criteria where scores or assessments were made against all the employees that potentially were subject to redundancy in order to select which employees were made redundant. However, in a recent judgement by Lord Neuberger (the country's most senior judge) this position may have changed. 
Lord Neuberger sitting in the Employment Appeal Tribunal decided in the case of Mitchells of Lancaster (Brewers) -v- Tattersall [2012] UKEAT/0605/11 that a "subjective criteria" could be used in certain circumstances. 

In this particular case, the decision related to a relatively small company in serious financial difficulties, where the board decided to make one redundancy out of 5 people in its management team. It was decided the selection criteria would be "whose post could be abolished with the minimum detrimental impact on the business". Clearly this is a subjective view that the directors would have to take rather than the traditional objective method where a scoring system based on a matrix or assessment is used. Lord Neuberger stated, "It is hard to see how it can be inappropriate for a relatively small company in serious financial difficulties.... to apply this criteria...". 

Only time will tell how this decision will be applied in due course, but it appears that a change in approach has occurred.

If you require any advice with regard to employment matters, employment contracts, redundancy, unfair dismissal, wrongful dismissal or a compromise agreement please do not hesitate to contact Andrew Veitch who may be  willing to initially discuss (for free) whether or not he will be  to assist or advise you further. 



This blog provides basic general legal information to help people understand their legal rights, but is not a substitute for personal legal advice from a solicitor. By the very nature of a blog the information published in blog posts on this site may be out of date. Therefore this blog is subject to our following disclaimer and conditions of use: Where no personal consultation has taken place with Andrew Veitch or the partners or employees of Guy Clapham & Co under no circumstances will Andrew Veitch or the partners of Guy Clapham & Co be responsible for (1) any information contained in, omitted or received from this site, (2) any persons reliance on any such information, whether or not the information is correct, current or complete, (3) the consequences of any action you or any other person takes or fails to take, whether or not based on information provided (4)

Friday, 7 December 2012

ILLEGAL CAR CLAMPING - ANDREW VEITCH PROPERTY LAWYER IN LONDON W1

PROTECTION OF FREEDOMS ACT 2012


Since the 1st October 2012 Section 54 of the Protection of Freedoms Act 2012 makes it illegal for anyone other than lawful authorities to clamp or remove vehicles parked on private land.


This blog provides basic general legal information to help people understand their legal rights, but is not a substitute for personal legal advice from a solicitor. By the very nature of a blog the information published in blog posts on this site may be out of date. Therefore this blog is subject to our following disclaimer and conditions of use: Where no personal consultation has taken place with Andrew Veitch or the partners or employees of Guy Clapham & Co under no circumstances will Andrew Veitch or the partners of Guy Clapham & Co be responsible for (1) any information contained in, omitted or received from this site, (2) any persons reliance on any such information, whether or not the information is correct, current or complete, (3) the consequences of any action you or any other person takes or fails to take, whether or not based on information provided (4)

Monday, 19 November 2012

Employment solicitor London W1 - Andrew Veitch expert advice - National Minimum Wage


NATIONAL MINIMUM WAGE RATES 

Employment lawyer in London W1 - Andrew Veitch 


From 1 October 2012 the new National Minimum Wage rates are:

£6.19 - the main rate for workers aged 21 and over (up from £6.08)

£4.98 - the rate for workers aged 18-20 

£3.68 - the rate for workers above school leaving age but under 18 

£2.65 - the rate for apprentices under 19 ,or 19 or over and in the first year of their apprenticeship 

Employers need to ensure they are compliant and check if contracts and recruitment documentation needs to be amended. If an employer is found not to have paid their employees the minimum wage they face having to pay any outstanding arrears in wages, a penalty of up to £5,000 and in the most serious cases criminal prosecution. 

This blog provides basic general legal information to help people understand their legal rights, but is not a substitute for personal legal advice from a solicitor. By the very nature of a blog the information published in blog posts on this site may be out of date. Therefore this blog is subject to our following disclaimer and conditions of use: Where no personal consultation has taken place with Andrew Veitch or the partners or employees of Guy Clapham & Co under no circumstances will Andrew Veitch or the partners of Guy Clapham & Co be responsible for (1) any information contained in, omitted or received from this site, (2) any persons reliance on any such information, whether or not the information is correct, current or complete, (3) the consequences of any action you or any other person takes or fails to take, whether or not based on information provided (4)

Wednesday, 7 November 2012

COMMISSIONER FOR OATHS, CERTIFYING DOCUMENTS AND CHANGE OF NAME DEED POLL - LONDON SOLICITOR ANDREW VEITCH


COMMISSIONER FOR OATHS - CERTIFYING DOCUMENTS - CHANGE OF NAME DEED POLL

Affidavits, Statutory Declarations, Oaths, Change of Name Deed Poll or Certifying documents:-


Andrew Veitch a solicitor in London W1 can act as a Commissioner of Oaths in witnessing and swearing statutory declarations, oaths or affidavits. I can also provide certified copies of documents by certifying that the original documents are true copies of the originals.

I also draft statutory declarations and affidavits, to legalise issues that require a declaration to be made. I can also draft change of name deed polls if you would like your name changed or wish to regularise your name where there has been a discrepancy on your passport or birth certificate.

In English law, a Commissioner for Oaths is a person appointed by the Lord Chancellor with power to administer oaths or take affidavits. The following fees are prescribed by the Commissioners for Oaths (Fees) Order 1993/2297:

For taking or swearing an affidavit, declaration or affirmation, for each person £5.00 

In addition, for each exhibit or schedule referred to in the document being sworn and required to marked there is a fee of £2.00. 

Please contact Andrew Veitch if require an affidavit, statutory declarations, oaths or deed polls to be drafted or for it to be witnessed or sworn. 

Tel: 020 7935 1095

E-mail: andrew@guyclapham.com

Blog: www.andrewveitchsolicitor.blogspot.com


This blog provides basic general legal information to help people understand their legal rights, but is not a substitute for personal legal advice from a solicitor. By the very nature of a blog the information published in blog posts on this site may be out of date. Therefore this blog is subject to our following disclaimer and conditions of use: Where no personal consultation has taken place with Andrew Veitch or the partners or employees of Guy Clapham & Co under no circumstances will Andrew Veitch or the partners of Guy Clapham & Co be responsible for (1) any information contained in, omitted or received from this site, (2) any persons reliance on any such information, whether or not the information is correct, current or complete, (3) the consequences of any action you or any other person takes or fails to take, whether or not based on information provided (4)






Monday, 29 October 2012

Property solicitor in London W1 - Andrew Veitch - Squatters and squatting and the distinction between residential and commercial property


SQUATTING:  THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL PROPERTY

On 1 September 2012 squatting in a residential building became an offence under S.144 Legal Aid Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act 2012  (“the Act”). Under the Act squatters found in residential premises can be fined a maximum of £5,000 and/or imprisoned for up to six months. To a certain extent, it may be more important to homeowners that the squatters can now be arrested and quickly removed from the property, without the need to undertake lengthy possession proceedings through the courts. 

The offence applies when a person trespasses in a residential property with the intention of living there. Section 144 of the Act provides that a person commits an offence if: the person is in a residential building as a trespasser having entered as a trespasser; the person knows or ought to know that he or she is a trespasser; and the person is living in the building or intends to live there for any period. A ‘building’ is defined as including any structure or part of a structure (including a temporary or moveable structure) and a building is ‘residential’ if it is designated or adapted, before the time of entry, for use as a place to live. Please note the Act cannot be used with regard to tenants who have failed to pay rent and are in rent arrears. 

On 2nd September 2012 Alex Haigh, Anthony Ismond and Michelle Blake were found squatting in a residential property in Cumberland Street in London and were arrested and removed from the property. These squatters subsequently pleaded guilty in court and Haigh was sentenced to 12 weeks in prison. 

However, web-sites, which provide information on squatting, are already making it common knowledge that commercial premises are not covered by the Act. Thus it is likely that squatters will now deliberately target commercial premises, instead of residential premises. Accordingly, landlords of commercial property need to be extra vigilant in taking steps to ensure that vacant commercial property is secured to stop occupation by squatters. 



This blog provides basic general legal information to help people understand their legal rights, but is not a substitute for personal legal advice from a solicitor. By the very nature of a blog the information published in blog posts on this site may be out of date. Therefore this blog is subject to our following disclaimer and conditions of use: Where no personal consultation has taken place with Andrew Veitch or the partners or employees of Guy Clapham & Co under no circumstances will Andrew Veitch or the partners of Guy Clapham & Co be responsible for (1) any information contained in, omitted or received from this site, (2) any persons reliance on any such information, whether or not the information is correct, current or complete, (3) the consequences of any action you or any other person takes or fails to take, whether or not based on information provided (4)

Friday, 26 October 2012

Divorce solicitor in London Andrew Veitch - financial settlement and maintenance


ADVICE ON OBTAINING A DIVORCE FINANCIAL SETTLEMENT AND MAINTENANCE

In divorce proceedings, either spouse (husband or wife) has the ability to make a claim against the other for a financial settlement. This type of claim is called ancillary relief proceedings. There is no time limit for making such a financial claim, unless you remarry before making a financial claim. Private settlements between spouses do not bind the court.

The court has the power to make four main types of order:-

Periodical Payments

The payment of regular amounts of money to the other spouse (normally paid weekly or monthly). These payments are often referred to as maintenance or in the USA as alimony.

Lump Sum Order

A one-off payment of money from one spouse to the other.

Property Adjustment Order

An order that property (such as a family home) can be either transferred to the other spouse or sold.

Pension Sharing Order

The court can order that a certain percentage from one spouse’s pension can be used to create a separate pension fund for the other spouse.


Often people believe that it is unnecessary to obtain a formal court order setting out a financial settlement when they divorce. However, circumstances can change as you may receive an inheritance or if you are extremely lucky win the lottery or you could be promoted with a larger salary or your spouse may lose their job. This may then result in a financial claim being made against you, which would not have been possible if you had already entered into a “clean break” settlement.

In a clean break consent order the parties set out a financial agreement that is then approved by the court and this formally dismisses the right for either spouse to ask for more money from each other in the future. A clean break consent order is likely to be granted if the terms agreed between the parties seem fair and reasonable to the court. Of course a clean break order may not be suitable for you if you believe that your spouse may become wealthier in the future.

It is also important to consider potential claims under the Inheritance (Provision for Family and Dependants) Act 1975, as a former spouse even after you have divorced (obtained a decree absolute) may have a claim against your estate. Therefore such a potential claim should be dealt with in the drafting of the court order in order to defeat such a claim.

 It is extremely important to remember that the family courts have wide discretion when dealing with ancillary relief financial applications. As the saying goes – there is more than one way to skin a cat! Thus the judgements of family courts can vary significantly from one particular case to another in order to deal with particular circumstances involved.

Please contact Andrew Veitch to discuss any family law, divorce or ancillary relief matters you may wish to obtain advice upon:

Tel: 020 7935 1095

E-mail: andrew@guyclapham.com

Blog: www.andrewveitchsolicitor.blogspot.com


This blog provides basic general legal information to help people understand their legal rights, but is not a substitute for personal legal advice from a solicitor. By the very nature of a blog the information published in blog posts on this site may be out of date. Therefore this blog is subject to our following disclaimer and conditions of use: Where no personal consultation has taken place with Andrew Veitch or the partners or employees of Guy Clapham & Co under no circumstances will Andrew Veitch or the partners of Guy Clapham & Co be responsible for (1) any information contained in, omitted or received from this site, (2) any persons reliance on any such information, whether or not the information is correct, current or complete, (3) the consequences of any action you or any other person takes or fails to take, whether or not based on information provided (4)

Thursday, 25 October 2012

Andrew Veitch Solicitor London W1 - Administration of Estates



ADMINISTRATION OF ESTATES OF MISSING PEOPLE

The Presumption of Death Bill is due to receive its second reading in the House of Commons on 2 November 2012. As the law stands at the moment there are great difficulties in registering the death of a missing person. Without a death certificate probate cannot be obtained nor the deceased’s estate administered.  Other issues are also made problematic such as selling property held in the missing person’, dissolving a marriage, claiming life insurance and pensions. In common law there is a presumption that if a person has been missing for seven years they are presumed dead. However there is no statutory provision relating to the presumption of death.  If the Bill is passed and placed on the statute books it will introduce new laws to help relatives arrange the financial affairs of missing people and with much greater ease than relying on the common law presumption of death.

If you require any advice regarding probate or the administration of estates or matters relating to wills please do not hesitate to contact Andrew Tel: 020 7935 1095   E-mail: av@guyclapham.com

This blog provides basic general legal information to help people understand their legal rights, but is not a substitute for personal legal advice from a solicitor. By the very nature of a blog the information published in blog posts on this site may be out of date. Therefore this blog is subject to our following disclaimer and conditions of use: Where no personal consultation has taken place with Andrew Veitch or the partners or employees of Guy Clapham & Co under no circumstances will Andrew Veitch or the partners of Guy Clapham & Co be responsible for (1) any information contained in, omitted or received from this site, (2) any persons reliance on any such information, whether or not the information is correct, current or complete, (3) the consequences of any action you or any other person takes or fails to take, whether or not based on information provided (4)

Wednesday, 24 October 2012

Solicitor London W1 employment law Andrew Veitch


Supreme Court judgement on missed bonuses

On Wednesday 24th October 2012 the Supreme Court has ordered that a total of 174 female ex-Birmingham City Council workers may proceed with compensation claims over missed bonuses (thus lower pay) after Birmingham council lost a court appeal. In this landmark judgement the Supreme Court rejected the council's argument that the claims should have been to an Employment Tribunal made within six months of the women leaving their jobs. The former female workers now have six years to submit their compensation claims. The claims relate to the fact that although the women were paid the same salaries as men the women were not offered bonuses of up to £15,000 that the women weren't entitled to and never received.

If you have any employment matters such as drafting employment contracts or compromise agreements or claims for unfair, wrongful or constructive dismissal pleased do not hesitate to contact Andrew Veitch solicitor London W1 :-

Tel: 020 7935 1095

E-mail: andrew@guyclapham.com.




This blog provides basic general legal information to help people understand their legal rights, but is not a substitute for personal legal advice from a solicitor. By the very nature of a blog the information published in blog posts on this site may be out of date. Therefore this blog is subject to our following disclaimer and conditions of use: Where no personal consultation has taken place with Andrew Veitch or the partners or employees of Guy Clapham & Co under no circumstances will Andrew Veitch or the partners of Guy Clapham & Co be responsible for (1) any information contained in, omitted or received from this site, (2) any persons reliance on any such information, whether or not the information is correct, current or complete, (3) the consequences of any action you or any other person takes or fails to take, whether or not based on information provided (4)